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What's Up!

03.06.14

Please be advised, that the Heinz Company Store’s last day of operation will be WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014.

02.13.12

The H.J. Heinz Company Ltd. - Company Store - Dates Open

02.13.12

2012 Scholarship

 

Changing Patterns of Unionization...

Statistics Canada

In 2004, more than 4 million workers were unionized, up 43% from 1977. The increase in unionization, however, has lagged behind employment growth.
Read more...

01.27.10

Even in a lean year, UAW members open their hearts, wallets.
Read more...

 

EMERGENCY LEAVE...

Emergency leave is unpaid, job-protected leave of up to 10 days each year.

Emergency leave may be taken in the case of illness, injury and certain other emergencies and urgent matters.

Employees who work for employers that regularly employ at least 50 employees are entitled to Emergency leave.

The employee is not entitled to Emergency leave under the ESA.

  • personal illness, injury or medical emergency, and
  • death, illness, injury, medical emergency of or urgent matters relating to:
    • a spouse or same-sex partner
    • a parent, step-parent, foster parent, child, step-child, foster child, grandparent, step-grandparent, grandchild or step-grandchild of the employee, the employee's spouse or the employee's same-sex partner
    • the spouse or same-sex partner of an employee's child
    • a brother or sister of the employee
    • a relative of the employee who is dependent on the employee for care or assistance.

No. Unpaid Emergency leave can be taken because of illness or death in particular circumstances. Sickness or bereavement leaves, however, are often part of a workplace policy or employment contract, or covered under employer benefit plans.

No. Emergency leave is unpaid, job-protected leave of up to 10 days each calendar year. Emergency leave may be taken in the case of personal illness, injury or medical emergency and the death, illness, injury, medical emergency of or urgent matters relating to certain family members and dependent relatives.

Family Medical leave, on the other hand, is unpaid, job-protected leave of up to eight (8) weeks in a 26 week period. Family Medical leave may be taken to provide care and support to certain family members for whom a qualified health practitioner has issued a certificate stating that this family member has a serious illness with a significant risk of death occurring within a period of 26 weeks.

Further, while only employees who work for employers that regularly employ at least 50 employees are entitled to Emergency leave, this is not a requirement for Family Medical leave. The persons for whom a Family Medical leave may be taken differ from the persons specified for Emergency leave. See "Family Medical Leave"  

An employee may be entitled to both leaves. They are separate leaves and the right to each leave is independent of any right an employee may have to the other leave. An employee who qualifies for both leaves would have full entitlement to each leave.

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBLITIES...

An Emergency leave of absence can last up to 10 days a year.

The 10 days of an Emergency leave don't have to be taken consecutively.

However, Emergency leave is generally counted in full days. Even if an employee takes only part of a day as an Emergency leave, the employer can count it as a full day of leave. For example, an employee who takes half a day off to take his or her child for medical tests may be deemed to have taken one day's leave.

An employee must inform the employer that he or she will be taking an Emergency leave of absence.

If an employee has to begin an Emergency leave before notifying the employer, he or she must inform the employer as soon as possible after starting the leave.

An employer is allowed to ask an employee to provide evidence that he or she is eligible for an Emergency leave of absence. The employee is required to provide evidence that is reasonable in the circumstances.

No. If an employee is eligible for an Emergency leave, the employer can't penalize him or her in any way for taking a leave.

  • Employers do not have to pay wages when an employee is on Emergency leave
  • Employees earn seniority and credit for length of service and length of employment while on Emergency leave
  • While an employee is on Emergency leave, the employer must continue to pay its share of the premiums to certain benefit plans (i.e., pension plans, life, accidental death, extended health insurance plans and dental plans) that were offered before the leave.